June 23, 2014

Adventures in Genre-Hopping: The First Scene

The research and study is going well. I've already learned a lot and I've noticed that my style is changing. I'm still taking classes online when I get the chance, but in the meantime...

It's time to start.

Yeah. The first scene. The big one.

Okay, so it's not quite so dramatic because I can (and probably will) change it a thousand times and then delete it before the final draft. It's part of the job description. I must kill my darlings.

But the first draft is a big step. It's intimidating. I'm staring at a blank page on my computer screen. How am I going to start this? Who is my main character? Where is she?

I want to do this as a Young Adult story, so my main character should probably in high school. And when I write books from solely a male point of view, things go badly. (I haven't finished a single one yet. They just fall apart like a bad batch of brownies.) So she's a teenage girl.

My first idea is that my character needs to be dealing with mundane things until her grandmother shows up and tells her that she's special. She can travel through time and she's needed so the balance of time can be restored.

But that's been done a few times in speculative fiction. Just a few.

So maybe I could change it up a bit. Maybe she could be approached by someone else. Maybe they help her out of a nasty situation and they give her a wonderful opportunity.

Yeah. I like that better.

And it might be a little more fun if my character has some idea of her abilities before the story starts.

And she needs a name. Time to hit the baby names websites...

June 9, 2014

Adventures in Genre-Hopping: Craft

Before I dive into another series of books, I want to work on my writing craft. I'm a writer, and there's an endless amount of STUFF to learn. I spent years working on craft before I wrote The Fairy Tale Trap, and have dabbled since. Now, I want to dig deep again.

So I listened to a lecture on Science Fiction and how to write it more effectively. I'm also taking an online workshop on writing more in depth. This will take up a big chunk of my writing time, but it'll be worth it. Quality over quantity at this point.

I'd also like to go over some STUFF that I've read before, but need to review. I plan to go through Holly Lisle's massive online class: How to Think Sideways, as well as re-read some books on craft. (Dwight Swain comes to mind.)

That ought to do it for now. Let's see if I survive before moving on.

May 26, 2014

Adventures in Genre-Hopping: Dissection

"Mediocre writers borrow, great writers steal."

--T.S. Elliot

I think Pablo Picasso said something similar: "The bad artists imitate, the great artists steal."

I don't plan to plagiarize, here, just for the record. Writers steal all the time, and it's perfectly legal, if you know how to do it right. I'm not stealing other people's works or words and passing them off as my own.This is research of the market and of the genre. To be able to write a time travel novel, I need to understand a time travel novel.

Joanna Penn wrote on her blog: 

  • Steal ideas. Read other people’s works, or look at other people’s art work. If you like an idea, ruminate on it, muddle it around in your brain and see where it ends up. Write the same idea in your own words and you can bet it will be a different story or a new angle on it. Steal other people’s experiences and write about them for plot. Steal their words as they speak to help your dialogue. How many books about the end of the world are there? How many unrequited love stories? How many quest adventures?
So I want to take some of my favorite time travel stories that I've read so far, and find out what makes them tick. Have you ever taken something apart and put it back together, just to see how it works? (Neither have I. I'm not mechanically inclined, but I hear some people do this.)

This involves the following steps:
1) Read books
2) Choose a few that are excellent
3) Read them again, looking for structural elements
4) Write those elements down
5) Analyze them. Do you see any patterns? Have these structures been used by more than one author? What works? What would you change?

So I'm mapping out a few stories. The notes I'm making (the parts that I'm "stealing") are things like: 

Mentor is in conflict with main character's Norm
Call to Action
Main character tries to return to Norm, but encounters disaster
etc...

So, for Back to the Future, I might start off my notes with:
Main Character in the Norm (good things and bad things) and receives object that will help later
Main Character is introduced to time travel
Main Character inadvertently time travels (without being fully prepared)
Main Character changes the future, which would destroy the Norm
Main Character seeks out Mentor
MC and Mentor use object to formulate plan
etc...

**Spoiler for Back to the Future I (you know, from 1985...)**
The Mentor is Doc Brown in this particular story, but it could be any knowledgeable character. The "object" is something I didn't even notice until I started paying attention to the structure of the story: it's the flyer that Marty gets from the crazed lady in front of the clock tower. That flyer has information on the lightning strike that will help get him home near the end of the movie. Marty only keeps the flyer because his girlfriend wrote a phone number on it (because why else would a teenage boy carry around a flyer to "save the clock tower"?)
****
Hopefully, I'll figure out a plot structure that is totally awesome and works for my characters and my ideas. Once I have my basic time travel ideas and characters created, I'll see if I can plug their particulars into these structures. It might work, it might not, but I'll be able to see my story in a new light.

Part of me thinks I should map out some good stories from other genres...maybe mystery or thriller. Thoughts?

For now, I'm going to let these ideas simmer on the back burner.

Do you ever think about the structure of a story? Besides structure and basic plot, what does a story need?

May 12, 2014

Adventures in Genre-Hopping: Practice

I'm still researching time travel and part of that involves practice. I wanted to play around with time travel on the page. (It's kind of like, I can study basketball and the game and the rules and even physics all I want, but if I never touch a basketball, I'll never be any good at it.)

So I've decided to write a short story anthology. My goal in 5 short stories.

So far, I've got two stories written, with basic revisions done. I have a beta reading them now. Hopefully, I'll get some good feedback and make some changes before writing my next short story.

These shorts won't hit the shelves right away. Once they're written and revised, I plan to submit each story to some scifi/fantasy magazines to see if they can get published. Hopefully, I can get some good feedback from the editors and maybe even readers of these publications, and of course, I'd love to make a sale if possible.

My first story (I'm calling it PROXY for the time being) is pretty short. It just explores a paradox of time travel: If you go back in time and kill someone vital to your existence, what happens? Why would you do that?

You see this all the time in time travel fiction: Marty McFly nearly un-makes himself by coming between his parents in the 50s.

Going back in time and killing your grandfather is a classic paradox of time travel theory. Some believe it can't be done. Others believe you'll create an alternate universe. I found a video of a physicist who explained the paradox using mathematics (which I thought was fascinating). His theory was that if you go back in time and kill yourself, you would cease to exist--as in, you were never born. (The nerd in me thought this was so freakin' cool.)

Whenever this paradox comes up, I always wonder: Well, why would you want to kill your grandfather, anyway? Or kill yourself?

So Proxy sort of explores that a bit. It's not exactly upbeat, but it was interesting for my little nerd brain to write.

The second story I wrote (which I'm calling TIME KILLER because I'm super-inventive like that) is about a serial killer with a time machine. The story follows a female homicide detective as she chases down a killer with a time machine. It's short. I mean, 6-8,000 words just wasn't enough to fully explore this situation. I may have to expand it into a novella or write other stories to really dig into this thing. It was SO much fun to write!

What short stories would you like to see in my time travel anthology?
.i2Style{ font:bold 24px Tahoma, Geneva, sans-serif; font-style:normal; color:#ffffff; background:#67b310; border:0px none #ffffff; text-shadow:0px -1px 1px #222222; box-shadow:2px 2px 5px #000000; -moz-box-shadow:2px 2px 5px #000000; -webkit-box-shadow:2px 2px 5px #000000; border-radius:90px 10px 90px 10px; -moz-border-radius:90px 10px 90px 10px; -webkit-border-radius:90px 10px 90px 10px; width:96px; padding:20px 43px; cursor:pointer; margin:0 auto; } .i2Style:active{ cursor:pointer; position:relative; top:2px; }